Davos: Many have called for a price on carbon Now we must act #Energy #Agenda 2014

Leading the Global Climate and Energy Agenda: This week, some 2,500 CEOs, politicians, academics and journalists descend on the Swiss village of Davos for the 44th annual meeting of the World Economic Forum. We’ll be posting video from the most interesting sci-tech events here in Forum. Related Industry Awakens to Threat of Climate Change By Coral Davenport,…

Climate / Energy Policy: The Full Obama Speech from June 25, 2013 in HD

Transcript PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: Thank you. Thank you. (Cheers, applause.) Thank you, Georgetown! (Cheers, applause.) Thanks. Thank you so much. Now — thank you, Georgetown. Everybody please be seated. And my first announcement today is that you should all take off your jackets. (Laughter.) I’m going to do the same. We got — (cheers) —…

Kevin Anderson on the Climate Crisis – Why 2.0C target?


Cabot Institute Annual Lecture 2012

Real clothes for the Emperor: Facing the challenges of climate change
Kevin Anderson, Professor of Energy and Climate Change, University of Manchester

Cabot Institute, University of Bristol http://www.bris.ac.uk/cabot

 

Real clothes for the emperor
Facing the challenges of climate change

Download the presentation slide sheets here.

Either governments are not serious about climate change or fossil-fuel firms are overvalued

By The Economist: MARKETS can misprice risk, as investors in subprime mortgages discovered in 2008. Several recent reports suggest that markets are now overlooking the risk of “unburnable carbon”. The share prices of oil, gas and coal companies depend in part on their reserves. The more fossil fuels a firm has underground, the more valuable its shares. But what if some of those reserves can never be dug up and burned?

If governments were determined to implement their climate policies, a lot of that carbon would have to be left in the ground, says Carbon Tracker, a non-profit organisation, and the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change, part of the London School of Economics. Their analysis starts by estimating the amount of carbon dioxide that could be put into the atmosphere if global temperatures are not to rise by more than 2°C, the most that climate scientists deem prudent. The maximum, says the report, is about 1,000 gigatons (GTCO2) between now and 2050. The report calls this the world’s “carbon budget”.