ScienceCasts: No Turning Back – West Antarctic Glaciers in Irreversible Decline

A 2014 study study led by NASA researchers shows that half-a-dozen key glaciers in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet are in irreversible decline. The melting of these sprawling icy giants will affect global sea levels in the centuries ahead. Read more http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2014/12may_noturningback/

NASA Antarctic Ice News about Glacier Retreat

Watch a 20 minute excerpt https://climatestate.com/2015/05/23/nasa-experts-explain-ice-melt-in-antarctica/ In 2014, NASA hosted a media teleconference to discuss new research results on the stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and its potential contribution to future sea level rise. The briefing participants are: — Eric Rignot, professor of Earth system science at the University of California, Irvine, and glaciologist…

Observing Antarctic Glaciers – Eric Rignot

Eric Rignot from UC Irvine discusses Observing Antarctic Glaciers. This talk was part of The Sleeping Giant: Measuring Ocean Ice Interactions in Antarctica short course at the Keck Institute for Space Studies at Caltech on September 9, 2013. Related Widespread, rapid grounding line retreat of Pine Island, Thwaites, Smith, and Kohler glaciers, West Antarctica, from…

New mechanism uncovered, causing potentially rapid Antarctic Glacier melt

An Australian-led research team found that sea levels may rise much faster than previously predicted by models, because changes by disruptive westerly winds, weren’t taken into account. Conservative estimates so far, projected irreversible melting in the course of a few centuries, depending on the temperature increase. Related Each degree of global warming might ultimately raise…

The Runaway Glaciers in West Antarctica

NASA/JPL press release, May 12, 2014: A new study by researchers at NASA and the University of California, Irvine, finds a rapidly melting section of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet appears to be in an irreversible state of decline, with nothing to stop the glaciers in this area from melting into the sea. The study presents…

Antarctica’s ice loss on the rise (December 2013)

Published 11 December 2013 | Release URL (ESA CryoSat) Three years of observations by ESA’s CryoSat satellite show that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is losing over 150 cubic kilometres of ice each year – considerably more than when last surveyed. The imbalance in West Antarctica continues to be dominated by ice losses from glaciers flowing…

Abrupt Climate Change In The Arctic (And Beyond) An Update

AGU Fall Meeting 2013: Our understanding of future Arctic change is informed by the history of past changes, which often have been both large and abrupt. The well-known ice-age events such as the Younger Dryas show how sea-ice changes can amplify forcing to produce very large responses, with wintertime sea ice especially important. These changes…