Observing Antarctic Glaciers – Eric Rignot

Eric Rignot from UC Irvine discusses Observing Antarctic Glaciers. This talk was part of The Sleeping Giant: Measuring Ocean Ice Interactions in Antarctica short course at the Keck Institute for Space Studies at Caltech on September 9, 2013. Related Widespread, rapid grounding line retreat of Pine Island, Thwaites, Smith, and Kohler glaciers, West Antarctica, from…

NASA: Vast Antarctic ice shelf a few years from disintegration

NASA has found that the last section of Antarctica’s Larsen B Ice Shelf is likely to disintegrate before the end of the decade. Transcript: We know that this ice shelf existed for at least 11 to 12 thousand years. In 2002, two-thirds of it collapsed in less than six weeks. In the intervening period between…

Rivers of meltwater on Greenland’s ice sheet contribute to rising sea levels

Using satellite and field work after an extreme melt event in Greenland, a UCLA-led study finds that melt-prone areas on its ice sheet develop a remarkably efficient drainage system of stunning blue streams and rivers that carry meltwater into moulins (sinkholes) and ultimately the ocean. However, the team’s measurements at the ice’s edge show that…

Bill McGuire: Modelling suggests with ice cap melt, an increase in volcanic activity

Climate State interviewed Bill McGuire, Emeritus Professor of Earth Sciences at the University College London, one of Britain’s leading volcanologists and contributing author to the 2011 IPCC report. He called for an early tsunami warning system (2004, The Guardian) and warned in his book The Waking Giant, of the Earth response (more earthquakes, tsunamis and…

Why is Antarctic sea ice expanding?

By Laura Naranjo (NSIDC), first published January 31, 2014. In the following  an edited version, reposted here with permission. Antarctic sea ice is ruled by very different systems than Arctic sea ice. The reasons behind this increase are complex, and several recent studies show that scientists are still trying to understand them. Ice and wind Atmospheric…

New mechanism uncovered, causing potentially rapid Antarctic Glacier melt

An Australian-led research team found that sea levels may rise much faster than previously predicted by models, because changes by disruptive westerly winds, weren’t taken into account. Conservative estimates so far, projected irreversible melting in the course of a few centuries, depending on the temperature increase. Related Each degree of global warming might ultimately raise…

The Runaway Glaciers in West Antarctica

NASA/JPL press release, May 12, 2014: A new study by researchers at NASA and the University of California, Irvine, finds a rapidly melting section of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet appears to be in an irreversible state of decline, with nothing to stop the glaciers in this area from melting into the sea. The study presents…

The Fingerprints of Sea Level Change

This meeting was held March 31-April 2, 2011 at the AAAS Auditorium, in Washington, D.C. and was organized by Rita Colwell, Christopher Field, Jeffrey Shaman, and Susan Solomon Meeting Overview Climate science is addressing issues that require an increasingly interdisciplinary perspective, posing new challenges to scientists and to the organization and support of this science.…

Melting Point Greenland – 2012 Documentary

2013 National Headliners Award First Prize Environmental Reporting HD 42 mins In the summer of 2012, one of the most vital ecosystems on earth, the Greenland ice sheet, experienced a meltdown that alarmed scientists the world over. Greenland is an island encased in ice and it’s the world’s second largest ice sheet after Antarctica. That…

Antarctica’s ice loss on the rise (December 2013)

Published 11 December 2013 | Release URL (ESA CryoSat) Three years of observations by ESA’s CryoSat satellite show that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is losing over 150 cubic kilometres of ice each year – considerably more than when last surveyed. The imbalance in West Antarctica continues to be dominated by ice losses from glaciers flowing…

NRC: Abrupt Impacts of Climate Change (2013)

Published 3rd December 2013: National Research Council Abrupt Impacts of Climate Change: Anticipating Surprises | Release URL Both abrupt changes in the physical climate system and steady changes in climate that can trigger abrupt changes in other physical, biological, and human systems present possible threats to nature and society. Abrupt change is already underway in some…

Abrupt Climate Change In The Arctic (And Beyond) An Update

AGU Fall Meeting 2013: Our understanding of future Arctic change is informed by the history of past changes, which often have been both large and abrupt. The well-known ice-age events such as the Younger Dryas show how sea-ice changes can amplify forcing to produce very large responses, with wintertime sea ice especially important. These changes…

Rebound an Earth Story

Glacial isostatic adjustment, why we have glacial and interglacial periods, how we can reconstruct climate history, and how the Earth is responding to the retreat of the continental glaciers. Video presentation by Meg Rosenburg (AGU Fall Meeting 2013) Post-glacial rebound

Singapore sized iceberg breaks off in Antarctica

Pine Island Glacier 2013, Nov. 10: This MODIS image taken by NASA’s Aqua satellite on Nov. 10, 2013, shows an iceberg that was part of the Pine Island Glacier and is now separating from the Antarctica continent. What appears to be a connection point on the top left portion of the iceberg is actually ice…

Sea level rise: New iceberg theory points to areas at risk of rapid disintegration

Video published on YouTube Nov 21, 2012 | Article published on July 22, 2013 by Nicole Casal Moore / University of Michigan ANN ARBOR—In events that could exacerbate sea level rise over the coming decades, stretches of ice on the coasts of Antarctica and Greenland are at risk of rapidly cracking apart and falling into…