Heatwaves blamed on Global Warming

Unusually high frequency points to human influence | NASA climatologist James Hansen made headlines during the US heatwave of 1988, declaring in testimony to Congress and during interviews on prime-time television that a build-up of greenhouse gases was increasing the probability of weather extremes. Now, as much of the United States sizzles through another torrid…

Ozone Levels Drop When Hurricanes Are Strengthening

Hurricanes and Ozone June 11, 2005 Ozone levels drop when a hurricane is intensifying. Xiaolei Zou and Yonghui Wu, researchers at Florida State University found that variations of ozone levels from the surface to the upper atmosphere are closely related to the formation, intensification and movement of a hurricane. They studied ozone levels in 12 hurricanes…

Climate Change Linked to Ozone Loss: May Result in More Skin Cancer

A newly-discovered connection between climate change and depletion of the ozone layer over the U.S. could allow more damaging ultraviolet (UV) radiation to reach the Earth’s surface. As reported in a paper published in the July 27 issue of Science, a team of researchers led by James G. Anderson, the Philip S. Weld Professor of…

Permafrost: The Tipping Time Bomb

“If we can limit our emissions, then the permafrost region will release less carbon to the atmosphere, there is a curve – it’s not a all or nothing question.” Ben Abbott One of the most feared of climate change “feedbacks” is the potential release of greenhouse gases by melting arctic permafrost soils. New research indicates…

James Hansen explains Climate Change and Free Market Solution

39:00 min = topic Carbon fee  Climate Scientist Hansen Turns Activist, Advocates ‘Fee’ on Carbon Pollution Bloomberg: James Hansen, the former NASA climate scientist who first brought climate change to the attention of Congress in the 1980s, stepped down as head of the agency’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies last month. That hasn’t stopped him…

Waleed Abdalati (NASA): Dramatic Changes in Polar Ice

Video: Welcome to the NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) Virtual Workshop live stream channel. Stay tuned to listen to featured keynote speakers covering research themes from climate modeling to remote sensing applications and high performance computing in Earth Sciences – Watch them live or browse through lectures from the video library. Please visit the NEX Virtual…

Humid air and the Jet Stream help to fuel more intense thunderstorms/tornadoes

“The fuel for the more intense storms would be the predicted warming of the Earth caused by the burning of fossil fuels that release greenhouse gases.” A combination of a slower Jet Stream (see video for explanation and study) and a more humid atmosphere increase the likelihood for a more intense thunderstorm environment. This conclusion…

Tar-Sands Oil Makes Climate Change Unsolvable

By Alex Morales / Bloomberg: Exploiting oil and gas trapped in tar sands and shale threatens to make climate change“unsolvable,” said James Hansen, the former NASA scientist who raised concerns about global warming in the 1980s. Conventional reserves of oil, gas and coal already have more carbon embedded in them than is safe to burn without causing “dangerous” levels of…

NASA: Warming-Driven Changes in Global Rainfall

By Kathryn Hansen NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. A NASA-led modeling study provides new evidence that global warming may increase the risk for extreme rainfall and drought. Model simulations spanning 140 years show that warming from carbon dioxide will change the frequency that regions around the planet receive no rain (brown), moderate rain (tan), and very heavy…

NASA: Arctic Ocean Currents Changed

The transpolar drift (purple arrows) is a dominant circulation feature in the Arctic Ocean that carries freshwater runoff (red arrows) from rivers in Russia across the North Pole and south towards Greenland. Under changing atmospheric conditions, emergent circulation patterns (blue arrows) drive freshwater runoff east towards Canada, resulting in freshening of Arctic water in the…