Lesson: Arctic Sea Ice Decline

Jennifer Francis, Rutgers University – assesses the broad topic of the Arctic Sea Ice Decline and explains seasonal impacts. Observations, especially since the 1950’s, explain how the “Arctic Amplification” leads to rapid sea ice changes during the summer month. Much more ridging in North America during the winter. And this affects weather patterns, because a…

Catastrophic sea levels ‘distinct possibility’ this century

A breakthrough study of fluctuations in sea levels the last time Earth was between ice ages, as it is now, shows that oceans rose some three meters in only decades due to collapsing ice sheets. The findings suggest that such an scenario — which would redraw coastlines worldwide and unleash colossal human misery — is…

First evidence of under-ice volcanic eruption in Antarctica

The first evidence of a volcanic eruption from beneath Antarctica’s most rapidly changing ice sheet. The volcano on the West Antarctic Ice Sheet erupted 2000 years ago (325BC) and remains active. Using airborne ice-sounding radar, scientists from British Antarctic Survey (BAS) discovered a layer of ash produced by a ‘subglacial’ volcano. It extends across an…

Video: Lake El’gygytgyn, Pleistocene super-Interglacials and Arctic warmth

John Mason / Skeptical Science: Here is a must-see 2012 presentation by Julie Brigham-Grette of the University of Massachusetts Amherst, covering the research her team has been doing into Lake El’gygytgyn (pronouned El-Guh-Git-Kin), a water-filled meteor crater in Arctic Russia that came into being after the impact of a ~1km diameter space-rock, 3.6 million years ago.…

Waleed Abdalati (NASA): Dramatic Changes in Polar Ice

Video: Welcome to the NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) Virtual Workshop live stream channel. Stay tuned to listen to featured keynote speakers covering research themes from climate modeling to remote sensing applications and high performance computing in Earth Sciences – Watch them live or browse through lectures from the video library. Please visit the NEX Virtual…

Humid air and the Jet Stream help to fuel more intense thunderstorms/tornadoes

“The fuel for the more intense storms would be the predicted warming of the Earth caused by the burning of fossil fuels that release greenhouse gases.” A combination of a slower Jet Stream (see video for explanation and study) and a more humid atmosphere increase the likelihood for a more intense thunderstorm environment. This conclusion…