Extinction Events in Earth History and Today

Flood basalts and mass extinctions – ancient hyperthermals as analogs for anthropogenic climate change.  Oceanic Anoxic Event (OAE) and mass extinctions are considered to be hyperthermals – usually associated with flood basalt eruptions.[2] Phases of rapid global warming, known collectively as hyperthermals.[1]  Flood basalts are a subset of large igneous provinces (LIPs), the terms flood basalt…

Atmospheric Oxygen Decline threatens Humanity’s Existence

Study: There has been a clear decline in the volume of oxygen in Earth’s atmosphere over the past 20 years. A recently proposed model predicts a non-linear decay, which would result in an increasingly rapid fall-off in atmospheric oxygen concentration, with potentially devastating consequences for human health. We predict that humans may continue to survive…

Ocean oxygen falling two to three times faster than predicted

The trend of oxygen falling is about two to three times faster than what we predicted from the decrease of solubility associated with the ocean warming. References Ocean oxygen decline greater than predicted (2017) http://climatenewsnetwork.net/ocean-oxygen-decline-greater-predicted/ Ocean Deoxygenation: Our Ocean’s Oxygen Supply & Demand Issue (2015) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hrHGwFrqIgg Low Oxygen Hypoxia in Marine Waters (2016) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b6RJi9k_VNE Image…

Dynamic deoxygenation within intensified coastal upwelling circulations (September 2016)

September 2016: Professor Andrew Bakun (University of Miami, USA) speaks at Royal Society event Ocean ventilation and deoxygenation in a warming world. Abstract Major deoxygenation commonly takes place in ocean regions that feature particularly intense coastal upwelling circulations. Prominent examples discussed herein include the seasonal Somali Current upwelling, which during the southwest monsoon becomes the…

Biogeochemical regulation: Anoxia in the Past and Present (September 2016)

September 2016: Professor Andrew Watson FRS, (University of Exeter, UK) speaks at Royal Society event Ocean ventilation and deoxygenation in a warming world. Abstract The major biogeochemical cycles which keep the present-day Earth habitable are linked by a network of feedbacks which has led to a broadly stable chemical composition of the oceans and atmosphere…

Ralph Keeling: Oxygen trends in Atmosphere and Ocean. What do we know?

September 2016: Professor Ralph Keeling ( Scripps Institute for Oceanography, USA) speaks at The Royal Society event, Ocean ventilation and deoxygenation in a warming world. Abstract Human activities are causing systematic decreases in the O2 content of both the atmosphere and the oceans. The atmospheric loss is driven primarily by the burning of fossil-fuels while…

Cleaner Air, The Ocean, and Global Warming

Reductions in sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions in recent years, for cleaner air, mainly in South East Asia due to a severe manufacturing sector slowdown and pollution policy changes (1,2) may attribute to current warming, since the phenomena called global dimming is involved. The first policies to address air pollution in the 20th century, originated after…

Climate change could suffocate life on planet Earth

EurekAlert (Release): Falling oxygen levels caused by global warming could be a greater threat to the survival of life on planet Earth than flooding, according to researchers from the University of Leicester. A study led by Sergei Petrovskii, Professor in Applied Mathematics from the University of Leicester’s Department of Mathematics, has shown that an increase in…

We need to really begin the phase out of CO2 emissions

Think of climate change as a cancer. Your doctor told you that he spotted what appears to be likely a melanoma skin cancer, but he is not 100% sure. Do you wait till the signs become more apparent? The cancer might spread in your body, by that diminishing the chance for survival, or do you ask the…