The Incredible Track Record of Early Climate Models

Thirty years ago, NASA scientist James Hansen testified to Congress that the age of climate change had arrived. Ashley Byrne interviews Jim Hansen for DW (published August 24, 2018) https://www.dw.com/en/worldlink-meet-mr-climate-change/av-45197919 Hansen et al 1981 https://pubs.giss.nasa.gov/abs/ha04600x.html Hansen et al 1988 https://pubs.giss.nasa.gov/abs/ha02700w.html From the Archives, 1988: Global Warming Has Begun, Expert Tells Senate https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/projects/cp/climate/2015-paris-climate-talks/from-the-archives-1988-global-warming-has-begun-expert-tells-senate STUDY FINDS WARMING…

The Climate State of the Holocene and Anthropocene (Rates of Change)

Supplemental of Trajectories of the Earth System in the Anthropocene Will Steffen, Johan Rockström, Katherine Richardson, Timothy M. Lenton, Carl Folke, Diana Liverman, Colin P. Summerhayes, Anthony D. Barnosky, Sarah E. Cornell, Michel Crucifix, Jonathan F. Donges, Ingo Fetzer, Steven J. Lade, Marten Scheffer, Ricarda Winkelmann, and Hans Joachim Schellnhuber PNAS August 6, 2018. 201810141;…

What it takes to limit Climate to 2C

How steep emissions reduction get, in order to limit global warming to two degrees celsius, visualized by Carbon Brief. Graph by Zeke Hausfather and animation by Rosamund Pearce for Carbon Brief. https://twitter.com/CarbonBrief/status/938809099830956033 For more from Carbon Brief follow https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiXgvmQ2jUgUjRpJzvga5Tg Tweets by CarbonBrief

The 936 PPM CO2 NASA Model Prediction

This NASA visualization is based on the latest IPCC report, and uses the business as usual scenario, where carbon dioxide concentrations rise to 936 parts per million—more than double today’s levels of 400 parts per million—by the year 2100. Temperature anomalies are estimated to be close to 4°C in the Arctic. https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/details.cgi?aid=11453

Arctic Climate Feedbacks [peer-reviewed]

This peer-reviewed educational video introduces feedbacks that are important in the Arctic climate system. It is aimed at an undergraduate non-science major level. The video was produced by a team of CIRES scientists in collaboration with CIRES Education and Outreach. Video production was funded by Professor Jennifer Kay’s CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation…