Methane levels are growing dangerously fast

Nature (February 2022): “Methane levels are growing dangerously fast,” says Euan Nisbet, an Earth scientist at Royal Holloway, University of London, in Egham, UK. The emissions, which seem to have accelerated in the past few years, are a major threat to the world’s goal of limiting global warming to 1.5–2 °C over pre-industrial temperatures, he…

Climate Change Could Affect Global Agriculture Within 10 Years

Climate impacts on global agriculture emerge earlier in new generation of climate and crop models: Potential climate-related impacts on future crop yield are a major societal concern. Here we report new twenty-first-century projections using ensembles of latest-generation crop and climate models. Results suggest markedly more pessimistic yield responses for maize, soybean and rice compared to…

Far outside the historical climate: Heat and Rainfall extremes

The study “Increasing heat and rainfall extremes now far outside the historical climate” found that the climate warmed 0.25C during the last decade, resulting in increased rainfall and heat extremes. Abstract Over the last decade, the world warmed by 0.25 °C, in-line with the roughly linear trend since the 1970s. Here we present updated analyses showing…

United States: Federal Climate Adaptation Plans 2021

Twenty three reports from various agencies offer candid descriptions of how climate change is already affecting the federal government’s work and the various threats the U.S. is facing. Impacts include increases in floods and droughts, more pests and disease affecting America’s food supply, while affordable housing is increasingly at risk from both extreme weather events…

The Climate State may Tip at 1.5 or 2 C of Global Temperature Rise

These results indicate that climate tipping is an imminent risk in the Earth System. Even the safe operating space of 1.5 or 2.0 degrees above present generally assumed by the IPCC might not be all that safe. According to the precautionary principle, we must consider abrupt and irreversible changes to the climate system as a real risk – at least until we understand these phenomena better.

Study: Interacting tipping elements increase risk of climate domino effects under global warming

The study, “Interacting tipping elements increase risk of climate domino effects under global warming” by Nico Wunderling, Jonathan F. Donges, Jürgen Kurths, and Ricarda Winkelmann from the Potsdam Institute finds potential severe consequences from continued climate change. The Guardian has a study breakdown, which can be accessed here. Analysis shows significant risk of cascading events even at 2C…

Audio: Overshooting 2C risks rapid and unstoppable sea level rise from Antarctica

CarbonBrief recently published a guest article by Robert M. DeConto, Pamela Pearson, and David Pollard, called Overshooting 2C risks rapid and unstoppable sea level rise from Antarctica. Here is now a text-to-speech conversation for people who like to listen to it. Visit Overshooting 2C risks rapid and unstoppable sea level rise from Antarctica to follow…

Study: Non-Monotonic Response of the Climate System to Abrupt CO2 Forcing

The 2021 published study Non-Monotonic Response of the Climate System to Abrupt CO2 Forcing (10.1029/2020GL090861) involves research from the Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, Center for Climate System Research, and the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. The study key points are: We examine the response of the climate system…

New study finds CO2 today enough to raise sea level by 20 metres

An international team of scientists, from Texas A&M University, the University of Southampton and the Swiss University ETH Zürich, led by the University of St Andrews, published their findings in the study, Atmospheric CO2 over the Past 66 Million Years from Marine Archives. The international team pulled together data collected over the last 15 years using high-tech laboratory techniques.  The combined data spans the…

Any reduction in emissions means shorter open-water periods

A new study be the University of Manitoba, finds that for every degree of global warming, the open water period in the Arctic will increase by roughly one month. The study, Arctic open-water periods are projected to lengthen dramatically by 2100 – published in the Nature journal Communications Earth & Environment, notes: The shrinking of Arctic-wide…