This topic contains 2 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Editor 5 years, 7 months ago.

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  • #4615

    Editor
    Keymaster

    This will be updated…

    Biosphere

    Farming

    Crop species may be more vulnerable to climate change than we thought http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140220112424.htm

    Forest

    Laminated Root Rot Caused by Phellinus Sulphurascens in Washington’s Forests (Academy of Sciences)

    Marine Life

    Climate change leaves ancient corals on Pilbara coast devastated by marine heatwaves February 13, 2014

    Ocean acidification promises a grim future for shellfish 31 January 2014 (OA ICC)

    Society

    Climate change brings more crime The study by Matthew Ranson of Abt Associates, a research and consulting firm in Cambridge, Mass., suggests global warming will trigger more crimes including murders and rapes over the next century, with social costs estimated to run as high as $115 billion. http://www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-climate-change-crime-20140219,0,2765136.story (LA Times Feb 19, 2014)

    Economy

    Costs of natural disasters in China surge to $69 billion BEIJING (Reuters) – Natural disasters including droughts, floods and earthquakes cost China 421 billion yuan ($69 bln) in 2013, official data showed on Monday, nearly double the total in the previous year. http://news.yahoo.com/costs-natural-disasters-china-surge-69-billion-101139059.html (February 24, 2014)

  • #5266

    Editor
    Keymaster

    Psychology

    The Psychological Impacts of Global Climate Change

    An appreciation of the psychological impacts of global climate change entails recognizing the complexity and multiple meanings associated with climate change; situating impacts within other social, technological, and ecological transitions; and recognizing mediators and moderators of impacts. This article describes three classes of psychological impacts: direct (e.g., acute or traumatic effects of extreme weather events and a changed environment); indirect (e.g., threats to emotional well-being based on observation of impacts and concern or uncertainty about future risks); and psychosocial (e.g., chronic social and community effects of heat, drought, migrations, and climate-related conflicts, and postdisaster adjustment).

    Three classes of psychological impacts

    Direct (e.g., acute or traumatic effects of extreme weather events and a changed environment)
    Indirect (e.g., threats to emotional well-being based on observation of impacts and concern or uncertainty about future risks)
    Psychosocial (e.g., chronic social and community effects of heat, drought, migrations, and climate-related conflicts, and postdisaster adjustment). http://climatestate.com/2013/05/04/the-psychological-impacts-of-global-climate-change/

  • #5265

    Editor
    Keymaster

    Health

    The impact of heat waves on children’s health: a systematic review

    Young children are thought to be particularly sensitive to heat waves, but relatively less research attention has been paid to this field to date. A systematic review was conducted to elucidate the relationship between heat waves and children’s health. Literature published up to August 2012 were identified using the following MeSH terms and keywords: “heatwave”, “heat wave”, “child health”, “morbidity”, “hospital admission”, “emergency department visit”, “family practice”, “primary health care”, “death” and “mortality”. Of the 628 publications identified, 12 met the selection criteria.

    The existing literature does not consistently suggest that mortality among children increases significantly during heat waves, even though infants were associated with more heat-related deaths. Exposure to heat waves in the perinatal period may pose a threat to children’s health. Pediatric diseases or conditions associated with heat waves include renal disease, respiratory disease, electrolyte imbalance and fever.

    Future research should focus on how to develop a consistent definition of a heat wave from a children’s health perspective, identifying the best measure of children’s exposure to heat waves, exploring sensitive outcome measures to quantify the impact of heat waves on children, evaluating the possible impacts of heat waves on children’s birth outcomes, and understanding the differences in vulnerability to heat waves among children of different ages and from different income countries.

    Projection of the children’s disease burden caused by heat waves under climate change scenarios, and development of effective heat wave mitigation and adaptation strategies that incorporate other child protective health measures, are also strongly recommended. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00484-013-0655-x

    Thanks to Climate Change, West Nile Virus Could Be Your New Neighbor A new study shows how climate change will contribute to the spread of the mosquito-borne West Nile virus http://science.time.com/2014/02/28/west-nile-virus-climate-change/ Related http://climatestate.com/?s=west+nile

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