Potential abrupt cataclysmic change and the Atlantic

A slowdown or even collapse of the Gulf Stream System as a result of global warming has long been a concern of climate scientists and has fuelled the imagination of Hollywood. Recent studies provide evidence for a AMOC slowdown. Release via Earth101 (Follow and subscribe to their channel too) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EmiVhT5cHpw Related German article http://scilogs.spektrum.de/klimalounge/qa-zum-golfstromsystem-und-dem-cold-blob-im-atlantik/ Related…

Ice sheet deglaciation and methane emissions, with the scope on Greenland’s melt season

On June 9 2016, Nuuk, the capital of Greenland, reached the warmest temperature ever recorded for the month of June anywhere on the island, 24 degrees Celsius (75 degrees Fahrenheit). An article from NSDIC, published June 22 elaborated on the broader situation: Surface melting on Greenland’s Ice Sheet proceeded at a brisk pace, with three…

NASA: Zachariæ Isstrøm Glacier Greenland entered accellerated retreat

NASA: Zachariæ Isstrøm has become the latest Greenland glacier to undergo rapid changes in a warming world. Research published November 2015 in Science found that Zachariæ Isstrøm broke loose from a stable position in 2012 and entered a phase of accelerated retreat. The consequences will be felt for decades to come. The reason? Zachariæ Isstrøm is…

NASA State of Sea Level Rise Science 2015 – 30 feet of SLR possible by 2100

Excerpt from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vDdNxb2xVBU Members of NASA’s new interdisciplinary Sea Level Change Team discussed recent findings and new agency research efforts during a media teleconference Aug. 26, 2015, at 12:30 p.m. EDT. The panelists for this briefing were: — Michael Freilich, director of NASA’s Earth Science Division at the agency’s headquarters in Washington — Steve Nerem,…

NASA Rising Seas: The State of the Greenland Ice Sheet (2015)

Seas around the world have risen an average of nearly 3 inches since 1992, with some locations rising more than 9 inches due to natural variation, according to the latest satellite measurements from NASA and its partners. An intensive research effort now underway, aided by NASA observations and analysis, points to an unavoidable rise of…

The Hidden Meltdown of Greenland!

Aug. 28, 2015: More than 90 percent of our planet’s freshwater ice is bound in the massive ice sheets and glaciers of the Antarctic and Greenland. As temperatures around the world slowly climb, melt waters from these vast stores of ice add to rising sea levels. All by itself, Greenland could bump sea levels by…

Ice Core Secrets Could Reveal Answers to Global Warming

At the Stable Isotope Lab in Boulder, Colo., scientists are doing a lot of the same things that those CSI folks do on TV. But instead of being “crime scene investigators,” these experts are more like “cold scene investigators.” Geoscientists like lab director Jim White work primarily with one raw material : ancient ice, in…

Greenland Ice Mass Loss: Jan. 2004 – June 2014

GRACE consists of twin co-orbiting satellites that fly in a near polar orbit separated by a distance of 220 km. GRACE precisely measures the distance between the two spacecraft in order to make detailed measurements of the Earth’s gravitational field. Since its launch in 2002, GRACE has provided a continuous record of changes in the…

Doubling times of 10, 20 or 40 years yield sea level rise of several meters

According to a new study, sea level rise of several meters might happen faster then previously thought. Based on data from past climate changes, when sea level rose to +5–9 m, including the occurrence of extreme storms – during a time when temperatures were less than 1 ◦C warmer than today, experts warn of similar…

Rivers of meltwater on Greenland’s ice sheet contribute to rising sea levels

Using satellite and field work after an extreme melt event in Greenland, a UCLA-led study finds that melt-prone areas on its ice sheet develop a remarkably efficient drainage system of stunning blue streams and rivers that carry meltwater into moulins (sinkholes) and ultimately the ocean. However, the team’s measurements at the ice’s edge show that…

Greenland ice sheet collapse, triggered ancient sea level rise 400,000 years ago

New evidence suggest that the longest interglacial (the time in between ice ages) – a warming period, called Marine Isotope Stage 11, more than 400,000 years ago, created nearly complete deglaciation of southern Greenland, thus contributed 4-6 meters to global sea level rise at that period. Overall se alevel rose about 6-13 meters above present…