How Scientists Study Antarctic Ice Melt

NASA Launches Eighth Year of Antarctic Ice Change Airborne Survey (Oct. 17, 2016) http://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2016/nasa-launches-eighth-year-of-antarctic-ice-change-airborne-survey Getz Ice Shelf: Iceberg B-34 Makes Its Debut off Antarctica http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=85727 NASA is tracking a gargantuan iceberg, escaped from Antarctica (2014) http://earthsky.org/earth/nasa-is-tracking-a-gargantuan-iceberg-escaped-from-antarctica Iceberg B31 Heads West (2014) http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=84795 Mapping Polar Ice (2013) https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/11194 Operation IceBridge 2012 Antarctic https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/11135 Getz Ice Shelf…

Sea level rise estimates doubled

Brady Dennis and Chris Mooney from The Washington post, recently reported on updated sea level rise projections. Sea levels could rise nearly twice as much as previously predicted by the end of this century if carbon dioxide emissions continue unabated, an outcome that could devastate coastal communities around the globe, according to new research published Wednesday. The main reason? Antarctica. Scientists…

Fossil Fuel Emissions could Eliminate the Antarctic Ice sheet entirely, causing about 58 m Sea Level Rise

A new open access study in Science Advances concludes that a warming beyond the 2°C target would potentially lead to rates of sea-level rise dominated by ice loss from Antarctica, and continued CO2 emissions from fossil sources could cause additional tens of meters of sea level rise, over the next millennia and eventually ultimately eliminate the…

Doubling times of 10, 20 or 40 years yield sea level rise of several meters

According to a new study, sea level rise of several meters might happen faster then previously thought. Based on data from past climate changes, when sea level rose to +5–9 m, including the occurrence of extreme storms – during a time when temperatures were less than 1 ◦C warmer than today, experts warn of similar…

ScienceCasts: No Turning Back – West Antarctic Glaciers in Irreversible Decline


A 2014 study study led by NASA researchers shows that half-a-dozen key glaciers in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet are in irreversible decline. The melting of these sprawling icy giants will affect global sea levels in the centuries ahead.

Read more http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2014/12may_noturningback/

NASA Antarctic Ice News about Glacier Retreat

Watch a 20 minute excerpt http://climatestate.com/2015/05/23/nasa-experts-explain-ice-melt-in-antarctica/ In 2014, NASA hosted a media teleconference to discuss new research results on the stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and its potential contribution to future sea level rise. The briefing participants are: — Eric Rignot, professor of Earth system science at the University of California, Irvine, and glaciologist…

Observing Antarctic Glaciers – Eric Rignot

Eric Rignot from UC Irvine discusses Observing Antarctic Glaciers. This talk was part of The Sleeping Giant: Measuring Ocean Ice Interactions in Antarctica short course at the Keck Institute for Space Studies at Caltech on September 9, 2013. Related Widespread, rapid grounding line retreat of Pine Island, Thwaites, Smith, and Kohler glaciers, West Antarctica, from…

New mechanism uncovered, causing potentially rapid Antarctic Glacier melt

An Australian-led research team found that sea levels may rise much faster than previously predicted by models, because changes by disruptive westerly winds, weren’t taken into account. Conservative estimates so far, projected irreversible melting in the course of a few centuries, depending on the temperature increase. Related Each degree of global warming might ultimately raise…

The Runaway Glaciers in West Antarctica

NASA/JPL press release, May 12, 2014: A new study by researchers at NASA and the University of California, Irvine, finds a rapidly melting section of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet appears to be in an irreversible state of decline, with nothing to stop the glaciers in this area from melting into the sea. The study presents…

Antarctica’s ice loss on the rise (December 2013)

Published 11 December 2013 | Release URL (ESA CryoSat) Three years of observations by ESA’s CryoSat satellite show that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is losing over 150 cubic kilometres of ice each year – considerably more than when last surveyed. The imbalance in West Antarctica continues to be dominated by ice losses from glaciers flowing…

Extensive ice in Antarctica

Released by National Snow and Ice Data Center | Access date January 4, 2013. While it is early winter in the Arctic, it is early summer in the Antarctic. Continuing patterns seen in recent years, Antarctic sea ice extent remains unusually high, near or above previous daily maximum values for each day in November. Sea ice…

Abrupt Climate Change In The Arctic (And Beyond) An Update

AGU Fall Meeting 2013: Our understanding of future Arctic change is informed by the history of past changes, which often have been both large and abrupt. The well-known ice-age events such as the Younger Dryas show how sea-ice changes can amplify forcing to produce very large responses, with wintertime sea ice especially important. These changes…