David Archer – Subsea Permafrost and the Methane Cycle on the Siberian Continental Shelf

ARCTIC-WISE: Bridging Northern Knowledges of Change Subsea Permafrost and the Methane Cycle on the Siberian Continental Shelf: Predictive Modelling for Climate Change David Archer, Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago Tuesday, March 10, 2015, 5-6:30 pm A numerical model called SpongeBOB is used to simulate the hydrology and methane cycle on the Siberian continental shelf. Lowered…

Experts: Arctic craters could be ‘Visible Effect’ of Global Warming

The preliminary results from scientists studying the mysterious holes (craters), that began emerging in recent times in Siberia, indicate that climate change may be a cause. The Russian crater research team led by Alexei Plekhanov of the Scientific Centre of Arctic Studies, explained a possible mechanism, in a Nature interview. The past two summers were…

Rapid sea-ice loss may increase the rate of Arctic land warming by 3.5 times – affecting permafrost

Recently a mysterious Siberian crater has been discovered, which subsequently raised questions about the circumstances surrounding the crater formation.  Theories include Pingo formation and connections to the thawing of permafrost (ClimateState reported). Robert Scribbler, summed it up: One theory on the feature is that it might be a pingo — a melting of a permafrost water pocket…

The melting of permafrost

Updated: Discovery of Positive Methane Feedback from Permafrost Thaw

Update: As pointed out by one of the authors, Rhiannon Mondav, the microbe is not considered an entire new discovery. (See comment below). Phys.org explains: Scientists from The University of Queensland have discovered a microbe that is set to play a significant role in future global warming. UQ’s Australian Centre for Ecogenomics researcher Ben Woodcroft said…

Thawing Permafrost Could Release Vast Carbon Deposits, Diseases

by Science World Report | January 8, 2014 | Release URL Dr Guido Grosse has been studying the Arctic for fourteen years to find out how the frozen ground, known as the permafrost, is reacting to an environment that is getting hotter all the time. The samples he has drilled out – in regions so…

USGS: Climate-Hydrate Interactions

The U.S. Geological Survey Gas Hydrates Project Release URL | Access date: January 3rd 2014. Climate studies in the USGS Gas Hydrates Project have become increasingly important since 2007 and focus on the impact of Late Pleistocene to contemporary climate change on the stability of methane hydrate deposits. The goal is to determine how much, if any,…

The melting of permafrost

Permafrost Methane Time Bomb

First published on YouTube Sep 9, 2012: Because of global warming, permafrost — the frozen ground that covers the top of the world — has been thawing rapidly over the last three decades. But there is cause for concern beyond the far north, because the carbon released from thawing permafrost could raise global temperatures even…