Global temperatures are unstable because of increased greenhouse gases

A study by scientists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, and Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, shows, in detail, the reason why global temperatures remain stable in the long run unless they are pushed by outside forces, such as increased greenhouse gases due to human impacts. Source http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=4936 Related Scientists say window…

Ice sheets may be hiding vast reservoirs of methane

The study indicates that under the frigid weight of Barents Sea Ice sheet, which covered northern Eurasia some 22 000 years ago, significant amounts of methane may have been stored as hydrates in the ground. As the ice sheet retreated, the methane rich hydrates melted, releasing the climate gas into the ocean and atmosphere for…

A potential future world scenario, driven by rapid regional changes

As someone who follows the climate topic for several years, I’ve to conclude that we are still far away from taking climate change seriously. Around 10 years ago there were rather minor groups of concerned scientists and bloggers, while the media was giving “a balanced view” to the so called deniersphere. This went on for…

AGU 2015: Eric Rignot – Ice Sheet Systems and Sea Level Change

Scientific Discipline Cryosphere Speaker Eric Rignot (NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory) Abstract Modern views of ice sheets provided by satellites, airborne surveys, in situ data and paleoclimate records while transformative of glaciology have not fundamentally changed concerns about ice sheet stability and collapse that emerged in the 1970’s. Motivated by the desire to learn more about…

AGU 2015: Global impacts of the 2015 – 2016 El Niño

The unfolding 2015-16 El Niño event is already the strongest the world has seen since 1997-98, and people all over the world are feeling or are expected to feel its impact in a variety of ways. Scientists from NASA and NOAA will present findings on El Niño’s global reach as seen from the vantage point…

AGU 2015: The impacts of heat stress on densely populated regions in the 21st century

Globally, heat kills more people than any other weather-related event. With temperatures and humidity expected to increase in the coming decades, heat stress is projected to have increasingly severe impacts on many regions of the world. Here, researchers estimate the global exposure to fatal heat stress throughout the 21st century and its effects on human…

AGU 2015: Alaska’s thawing permafrost Latest results and future projections

Alaska’s permafrost is starting to thaw as the climate warms, and scientists project there will be even greater thawing of the frozen soils in the coming decades, releasing carbon into the atmosphere, and impacting ecological systems and infrastructure. A panel of permafrost experts will unveil new findings about permafrost degradation in Alaska, where permafrost covers…

Anthony Giddens – The Politics of Climate Change


Repost from 2012: Anthony Giddens introduces a range of new concepts and proposals designed to address the most formidable challenge humanity faces this century.

Related
How Long Can Oceans Continue To Absorb Earth’s Excess Heat? http://e360.yale.edu/feature/how_long_can_oceans_continue_to_absorb_earths_excess_heat/2860/
Bio-energy with carbon capture and storage https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bio-energy_with_carbon_capture_and_storage

AGU 2015: Jennifer Francis recent studies on Weather Blocking Patterns

Recent Changes in Blocking Characteristics Assessed Using Self-Organizing Maps Speaker: Jennifer Ann Francis Blocking anticyclones are known to be associated with persistent weather patterns that often lead to extreme weather events. An outstanding question, however, is whether the frequency and/or intensity of these dynamical features are changing in response to human-caused climate change, and in…

What Exxon Knew

Newly released documents show that scientists at Exxon Oil Corporation conducted research on climate change and the greenhouse effect in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Their conclusions were in accord with mainstream scientific groups in academia, NASA, NOAA, and the Department of Energy, showing that global warming posed a serious problem, with potential “catastrophic…