Dan Lunt: Past climates and climate sensitivity #DeepTime #Reconstruction #3DEdition

To curiosity-driven scientist Dan Lunt, understanding the past climate of our Earth (from the scorching greenhouse of the mid-Cretaceous, to the frozen wastes of the last ice age) is of fundamental interest. Support more Climate State coverage: Paypal email: donate@ClimateState.com Patreon https://www.patreon.com/ClimateState Links for this episode: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/cabot/events/2015/past-future-fantasy.html Watch full lecture https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SiXREvxFws0 Related The 8 Minute…

A world with this much CO²: lessons from 4 million years ago

With Dr Chris Brierley, UCL Geography In Spring last year, carbon dioxide concentrations passed 400 parts per million in the atmosphere — a level not seen since the Pliocene era (3-5 million years ago), and perhaps not even then. We know that the Pliocene was a warm world without glacial cycles, and that the climate…

The Late Triassic Extinction, Persistent Photic Zone Euxinia, and Rising Sea Levels

Elevated pCO2 leading to Late Triassic extinction, persistent photic zone euxinia, and rising sea levels Caroline M.B. Jaraula, Kliti Grice, Richard J. Twitchett, Michael E. Böttcher, Pierre LeMetayer, Apratim G. Dastidar and L. Felipe Opazo doi:10.1130/G34183.1 Abstract The Late Triassic mass extinction event is the most severe global warming-related crisis to have affected important extant…

Most Comprehensive Paleoclimate Reconstruction Confirms Hockey Stick

By Stefan Rahmstorf via Scilogs The past 2000 years of climate change have now been reconstructed in more detail than ever before by the PAGES 2k project. The results reveal interesting regional differences between the different continents, but also important common trends. The global average of the new reconstruction looks like a twin of the…

Getting rich off global warming

“Local officials and enviros are making plans for a post-global warming America. And so are profit-seeking companies.”

BY  / via Salon.com

On the opening morning of the inaugural National Adaptation Forum, I was eating breakfast at a stand-up table in the exhibition hall when a mustachioed man of middle age plopped his cherry Danish next to my pile of conference literature, a mess of pamphlets and reports with titles likeGetting Climate Smart: A Water Preparedness Guide for State Action, and Successful Adaptation: Linking Science and Policy in a Rapidly Changing World. The nametag dangling above the Danish identified the man as Michael Hughes, director of public works for the Chicago suburb of Elmhurst. Like many attendees, Hughes was part of a new national emergency-response team without being fully aware of it. He had arrived in Denver knowing little about “adaptation,” the anemic catchall for attempts to fortify our natural and built environments against the epochal temperature spike in progress.

“I hadn’t even heard the term ‘adaptation’ a month ago,” he told me, taking a bite.