The hydrosphere (from Greek ὕδωρ – hudōr, “water”[1] and σφαῖρα – sphaira, “sphere”[2]) in physical geography describes the combined mass of water found on, under, and over the surface of a planet. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrosphere

The Fingerprints of Sea Level Change

This meeting was held March 31-April 2, 2011 at the AAAS Auditorium, in Washington, D.C. and was organized by Rita Colwell, Christopher Field, Jeffrey Shaman, and Susan Solomon Meeting Overview Climate science is addressing issues that require an increasingly interdisciplinary perspective, posing new challenges to scientists and to the organization and support of this science.…

Stronger Winds Shift Heat to Deeper Pacific

Published on Feb 9, 2014 Heat stored in the western Pacific Ocean caused by an unprecedented strengthening of the equatorial trade winds appears to be largely responsible for the hiatus in surface warming observed over the past 13 years. New research published in the journal Nature Climate Change indicates that the dramatic acceleration in winds…

UK Floods 2014 Could Last for Months + 1.6M Homes at Risk for Flooding

Andy McKenzie, a groundwater scientist at the British Geological Survey, told Sky News that even if the rain stopped today, so much water is soaking through the soil that levels are likely to keep rising for another two months. The risk of flooding could remain high until May, he said. According to the data from the…

2013 was the second-hottest year without an El Niño since before 1850

The Guardian: According to the global surface temperate data set compiled by Kevin Cowtan and Robert Way, which achieves the best coverage of the rapidly-warming Arctic by filling in data gaps between temperature stations using a statistical method called kriging, 2013 was the 5th-hottest year on record (since 1850). The top three hottest years (2010, 2005,…

Is Ocean Acidification an Open-Ocean Syndrome? Understanding Anthropogenic Impacts on Seawater pH

March 2013, Volume 36, Issue 2, pp 221-236 Read the full study @ http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12237-013-9594-3/fulltext.html | Abstract | PDF Carlos M. Duarte, Iris E. Hendriks, Tommy S. Moore, Ylva S. Olsen, Alexandra Steckbauer, Laura Ramajo, Jacob Carstensen, Julie A. Trotter, Malcolm McCulloch Abstract Ocean acidification due to anthropogenic CO2 emissions is a dominant driver of long-term changes in pH in the open ocean,…

Climate Change in the Ocean – the big picture? Ove Hoegh Guldberg (21mins Lecture)

Oct 15, 2013 by ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies http://www.youtube.com/user/CoralCoE/videos Presentation given at the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2013 Symposium: Coral Reefs in the 21st Century ~ James Cook University, in Townsville Australia by Professor Ove Hoegh Guldberg (21mins Lecture) Global Change Institute University of Queensland,…

Climate change is messing with coral skeletons – Aurelie Moya (7mins lecture)

Oct 15, 2013 by The ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies undertakes world-best integrated research for sustainable use and management of coral reefs. http://www.youtube.com/user/CoralCoE/videos & http://www.coralcoe.org.au/ Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies 2013 evening Forum: Coral Reefs in the 21st Century Research Fellow at James Cook University…

Reef decalcification under business-as-usual CO2 emission scenarios – Sophie Dove (24mins lecture)

Oct 14, 2013 by ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies – The ARC Centre of Excellence cements Australia’s leading contribution to coral reef sciences, and fosters stronger collaborative links between the major partners and 24 other leading institutions in nine countries. http://www.youtube.com/user/CoralCoE/videos & v Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence for…

Thawing Permafrost Could Release Vast Carbon Deposits, Diseases

by Science World Report | January 8, 2014 | Release URL Dr Guido Grosse has been studying the Arctic for fourteen years to find out how the frozen ground, known as the permafrost, is reacting to an environment that is getting hotter all the time. The samples he has drilled out – in regions so…

USGS: Climate-Hydrate Interactions

The U.S. Geological Survey Gas Hydrates Project Release URL | Access date: January 3rd 2014. Climate studies in the USGS Gas Hydrates Project have become increasingly important since 2007 and focus on the impact of Late Pleistocene to contemporary climate change on the stability of methane hydrate deposits. The goal is to determine how much, if any,…

NRC: Abrupt Impacts of Climate Change (2013)

Published 3rd December 2013: National Research Council Abrupt Impacts of Climate Change: Anticipating Surprises | Release URL Both abrupt changes in the physical climate system and steady changes in climate that can trigger abrupt changes in other physical, biological, and human systems present possible threats to nature and society. Abrupt change is already underway in some…

Ocean Acidification Summary for Policymakers 2013

Published by IGBP November 14, 2013 This summary for policymakers reports on the state of scientific knowledge on ocean acidification, based on the latest research presented at The Third Symposium on the Ocean in a High-CO2 World, held in Monterey, California, in September 2012. Experts present the projected changes from ocean acidification for ecosystems and the people who rely on…

Abrupt Climate Change In The Arctic (And Beyond) An Update

AGU Fall Meeting 2013: Our understanding of future Arctic change is informed by the history of past changes, which often have been both large and abrupt. The well-known ice-age events such as the Younger Dryas show how sea-ice changes can amplify forcing to produce very large responses, with wintertime sea ice especially important. These changes…

Scientists’ Concerns Challenge Conservative Sea-Level Rise Projections

Published on YouTube Dec 5, 2013: The most sobering evidence of the planet’s response to greenhouse gases comes from the fossil record. New evidence scientists are collecting suggests that ice sheets may be more vulnerable than previously believed, which has huge implications for sea level rise.