If There’s Global Warming … Why Is It So Cold?

It’s that time of year, the perennial “It’s snowing so it can’t be warming” season – or, as scientists call it, “winter”. Depends on where you’re standing, actually — I stood on a frozen lake with Dr. Jeff Masters to discuss the current planetary changes, but at the same time, in Alaska, historic warm temperatures…

NASA’s AIRS Sees Polar Vortex Behind U.S. Big Chill


Published January 2014: The chilling weather phenomenon that hit much of the U.S. in January is explained by scientist Eric Fetzer using data from NASA’s AIRS instrument.

Arctic Death Spiral 1979-2013 ( Sea Ice Decline / Deglaciation)

Monthly averages from January 1979 – 2014 (Jan). Data source via the Polar Science Center (University of Washington) URL.  Data visualisation by Andy Lee Robinson.   Arctic Death Spiral by Andy Lee Robinson is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Based on a work at http://haveland.com/share/arctic-death-spiral.png. Permissions beyond the scope of this license may…

Thawing Permafrost Could Release Vast Carbon Deposits, Diseases

by Science World Report | January 8, 2014 | Release URL Dr Guido Grosse has been studying the Arctic for fourteen years to find out how the frozen ground, known as the permafrost, is reacting to an environment that is getting hotter all the time. The samples he has drilled out – in regions so…

White House: The Polar Vortex Explained in 2 Minutes

by Becky Fried | January 08, 2014  | Release URL Here at the White House, while we’re beginning to thaw from this week’s bone-chilling deep freeze, our discussions about the science of weather extremes are heating up. We know that no single weather episode proves or disproves climate change. Climate refers to the patterns observed in the weather…

Melting Point Greenland – 2012 Documentary

2013 National Headliners Award First Prize Environmental Reporting HD 42 mins In the summer of 2012, one of the most vital ecosystems on earth, the Greenland ice sheet, experienced a meltdown that alarmed scientists the world over. Greenland is an island encased in ice and it’s the world’s second largest ice sheet after Antarctica. That…

Antarctica’s ice loss on the rise (December 2013)

Published 11 December 2013 | Release URL (ESA CryoSat) Three years of observations by ESA’s CryoSat satellite show that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is losing over 150 cubic kilometres of ice each year – considerably more than when last surveyed. The imbalance in West Antarctica continues to be dominated by ice losses from glaciers flowing…

Extensive ice in Antarctica

Released by National Snow and Ice Data Center | Access date January 4, 2013. While it is early winter in the Arctic, it is early summer in the Antarctic. Continuing patterns seen in recent years, Antarctic sea ice extent remains unusually high, near or above previous daily maximum values for each day in November. Sea ice…

Why is Antarctic sea ice growing?

Published on Nov 8, 2012: Suggestions that modest increases in sea ice around Antarctica offset significant losses in Arctic sea ice are based on a bogus “apples and oranges” comparison. Through interviews with a range of respected experts, Peter Sinclair’s newest Yale Forum video explains why such suggestions do not stand up to scientific scrutiny. Related…

USGS: Climate-Hydrate Interactions

The U.S. Geological Survey Gas Hydrates Project Release URL | Access date: January 3rd 2014. Climate studies in the USGS Gas Hydrates Project have become increasingly important since 2007 and focus on the impact of Late Pleistocene to contemporary climate change on the stability of methane hydrate deposits. The goal is to determine how much, if any,…

NRC: Abrupt Impacts of Climate Change (2013)

Published 3rd December 2013: National Research Council Abrupt Impacts of Climate Change: Anticipating Surprises | Release URL Both abrupt changes in the physical climate system and steady changes in climate that can trigger abrupt changes in other physical, biological, and human systems present possible threats to nature and society. Abrupt change is already underway in some…

The melting of permafrost

Permafrost Methane Time Bomb

First published on YouTube Sep 9, 2012: Because of global warming, permafrost — the frozen ground that covers the top of the world — has been thawing rapidly over the last three decades. But there is cause for concern beyond the far north, because the carbon released from thawing permafrost could raise global temperatures even…

Abrupt Climate Change In The Arctic (And Beyond) An Update

AGU Fall Meeting 2013: Our understanding of future Arctic change is informed by the history of past changes, which often have been both large and abrupt. The well-known ice-age events such as the Younger Dryas show how sea-ice changes can amplify forcing to produce very large responses, with wintertime sea ice especially important. These changes…

Scientists’ Concerns Challenge Conservative Sea-Level Rise Projections


Published on YouTube Dec 5, 2013: The most sobering evidence of the planet’s response to greenhouse gases comes from the fossil record. New evidence scientists are collecting suggests that ice sheets may be more vulnerable than previously believed, which has huge implications for sea level rise.

Rebound an Earth Story


Glacial isostatic adjustment, why we have glacial and interglacial periods, how we can reconstruct climate history, and how the Earth is responding to the retreat of the continental glaciers.

Video presentation by Meg Rosenburg (AGU Fall Meeting 2013)
Post-glacial rebound