Eric Rignot: Observations suggest that ice sheets and glaciers can change faster, sooner and in a stronger way than anticipated

Eric Rignot Professor of Earth system science at the University of California, Irvine, and scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory was interviewed on sea level rise and projections. Ice sheets and glaciers can change faster, sooner and in a stronger way than anticipated Machens: As an ice sheet expert, how do you see the sea-level projections…

Observing Antarctic Glaciers – Eric Rignot

Eric Rignot from UC Irvine discusses Observing Antarctic Glaciers. This talk was part of The Sleeping Giant: Measuring Ocean Ice Interactions in Antarctica short course at the Keck Institute for Space Studies at Caltech on September 9, 2013. Related Widespread, rapid grounding line retreat of Pine Island, Thwaites, Smith, and Kohler glaciers, West Antarctica, from…

NASA: Vast Antarctic ice shelf a few years from disintegration

NASA has found that the last section of Antarctica’s Larsen B Ice Shelf is likely to disintegrate before the end of the decade. Transcript: We know that this ice shelf existed for at least 11 to 12 thousand years. In 2002, two-thirds of it collapsed in less than six weeks. In the intervening period between…

Ocean May Be Melting Totten Glacier Says Study

Ocean access to a cavity beneath Totten Glacier in East Antarctica http://www.nature.com/ngeo/journal/v8/n4/full/ngeo2388.html Totten Glacier, the primary outlet of the Aurora Subglacial Basin, has the largest thinning rate in East Antarctica1, 2. Thinning may be driven by enhanced basal melting due to ocean processes3, modulated by polynya activity4, 5. Warm modified Circumpolar Deep Water, which has…

Rivers of meltwater on Greenland’s ice sheet contribute to rising sea levels

Using satellite and field work after an extreme melt event in Greenland, a UCLA-led study finds that melt-prone areas on its ice sheet develop a remarkably efficient drainage system of stunning blue streams and rivers that carry meltwater into moulins (sinkholes) and ultimately the ocean. However, the team’s measurements at the ice’s edge show that…

Bill McGuire: Modelling suggests with ice cap melt, an increase in volcanic activity

ClimateState interviewed Bill McGuire, Emeritus Professor of Earth Sciences at the University College London, one of Britain’s leading volcanologists and contributing author to the 2011 IPCC report. He called for an early tsunami warning system (2004, The Guardian) and warned in his book The Waking Giant, of the Earth response (more earthquakes, tsunamis and landslides)…

Arctic Sea Ice, Summer 2014 (NASA animation)

An animation of daily Arctic sea ice extent in summer 2014, from March 21, 2014 to Sept. 17, 2014 – when the ice appeared to reach it’s minimum extent for the year. It’s the sixth lowest minimum sea ice extent in the satellite era. The data was provided by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency from…

Everything you need to know about Mass Extinction, Sea Level Rise and Amplification

Professor Peter Ward (Professor, Sprigg Institute of Geobiology, The University of Adelaide) explains the interconnections of rising carbon dioxide levels and flood basalt, and how it leads to anoxic oceans (with Hydrogen sulfide). Ward explains how today’s CO2 levels will result in sea level rise with disrupting implications for crops and how deglaciation will ultimately…

Why is Antarctic sea ice expanding?

By Laura Naranjo (NSIDC), first published January 31, 2014. In the following  an edited version, reposted here with permission. Antarctic sea ice is ruled by very different systems than Arctic sea ice. The reasons behind this increase are complex, and several recent studies show that scientists are still trying to understand them. Ice and wind Atmospheric…

New mechanism uncovered, causing potentially rapid Antarctic Glacier melt

An Australian-led research team found that sea levels may rise much faster than previously predicted by models, because changes by disruptive westerly winds, weren’t taken into account. Conservative estimates so far, projected irreversible melting in the course of a few centuries, depending on the temperature increase. Related Each degree of global warming might ultimately raise…

The Runaway Glaciers in West Antarctica

NASA/JPL press release, May 12, 2014: A new study by researchers at NASA and the University of California, Irvine, finds a rapidly melting section of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet appears to be in an irreversible state of decline, with nothing to stop the glaciers in this area from melting into the sea. The study presents…

With further Arctic Amplification, How fast will Greenhouse Gas emissions accelerate in the Arctic Circle?

Introduction to Methane Hydrate “Methane Hydrates and Contemporary Climate Change” (2011) IDENTIFICATION This post “A Mechanism for Shallow Methane Hydrate Dissociation”, explores possible mechanism which could release vast quantities of shallow Methane Hydrate into the ocean and atmosphere.       CH4 Release The following studies explore the release of CH4 emissions in the Arctic region. OBSERVATION…

The Rate of Sea-Level Rise

A new study paper out in nature (Nature Climate Change / 2014 / doi:10.1038/nclimate2159), explores why the rise of sea-level has slowed in the last decade. Unsurprisingly the slow-down coincidences with the observed climate hiatus (IPCC AR5, Ocean heat content uptake). Because  heat is distributed differently, depending on the state of ENSO (between El Nino or La Nina). Abstract: Present-day sea-level…

Spot On – Rising Seas in South Florida (PBS 2014)

PBS: Flood-prone South Florida considers proactive investment against rising seas March 19, 2014 (with Transcript).

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