Abrupt cooling over the North Atlantic

Compiled recent findings on the interconnection of warming trends, and possible implications for ocean currents and what it could mean.

Abrupt cooling over the North Atlantic in modern climate models (2017) https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms14375

Is the Gulf Stream System Slowing? – the Earth101 lecture (2016) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EmiVhT5cHpw

Map of North Atlantic Subpolar gyre https://instaar.colorado.edu/meetings/AW2012/abstract_details.php?abstract_id=54

Potential abrupt cataclysmic change and the Atlantic

A slowdown or even collapse of the Gulf Stream System as a result of global warming has long been a concern of climate scientists and has fuelled the imagination of Hollywood. Recent studies provide evidence for a AMOC slowdown. Release via Earth101 (Follow and subscribe to their channel too) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EmiVhT5cHpw Related German article http://scilogs.spektrum.de/klimalounge/qa-zum-golfstromsystem-und-dem-cold-blob-im-atlantik/ Related…

Jim Hansen: Hell Will Break Loose – Ice Melt, Sea Level Rise and Superstorms

The main point that I want to make concerns the threat of irreparable harm, which I feel we have not communicated well enough to people who most need to know, the public and policymakers. I’m not sure how we can do that better, but I comment on it at the end of this transcript. In…

A potential future world scenario, driven by rapid regional changes

As someone who follows the climate topic for several years, I’ve to conclude that we are still far away from taking climate change seriously. Around 10 years ago there were rather minor groups of concerned scientists and bloggers, while the media was giving “a balanced view” to the so called deniersphere. This went on for…

Abrupt climate change 12,000 years ago provides clues about the future

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have found that a well-known period of abrupt climate change 12000 years ago occurred rapidly in northern latitudes but much more gradually in equatorial regions, a discovery that could prove important for understanding and responding to future climate change. The research, published Sept. 2 in Nature Communications,…

Abrupt Climate Change explained by Jim White, 12 Minutes excerpt (@AGU 2014)

Climate is changing as humans put more and more greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. With CO2 levels today around 400ppm, we are clearly committed to far more climate change, both in the near term, and well beyond our children’s future. A key question is how that change will occur. Abrupt climate changes are those that…

Siberian Arctic permafrost decay and methane escape

Widespread seafloor gas release from the seabed offshore the West Yamal Peninsula, suggests that permafrost has degraded more significantly than previously thought.  Gas is released in an area of at least 7500 km2 in water depths >20 m.((Offshore permafrost decay and massive seabed methane escape in water depths >20 m at the South Kara Sea shelf | http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/grl.50735/abstract | Alexey Portnov,…

Experts: Arctic craters could be ‘Visible Effect’ of Global Warming

The preliminary results from scientists studying the mysterious holes (craters), that began emerging in recent times in Siberia, indicate that climate change may be a cause. The Russian crater research team led by Alexei Plekhanov of the Scientific Centre of Arctic Studies, explained a possible mechanism, in a Nature interview. The past two summers were…

Rapid sea-ice loss may increase the rate of Arctic land warming by 3.5 times – affecting permafrost

Recently a mysterious Siberian crater has been discovered, which subsequently raised questions about the circumstances surrounding the crater formation.  Theories include Pingo formation and connections to the thawing of permafrost (ClimateState reported). Robert Scribbler, summed it up: One theory on the feature is that it might be a pingo — a melting of a permafrost water pocket…

Everything you need to know about Mass Extinction, Sea Level Rise and Amplification

Professor Peter Ward (Professor, Sprigg Institute of Geobiology, The University of Adelaide) explains the interconnections of rising carbon dioxide levels and flood basalt, and how it leads to anoxic oceans (with Hydrogen sulfide). Ward explains how today’s CO2 levels will result in sea level rise with disrupting implications for crops and how deglaciation will ultimately…