Arctic Sea Ice Reaches 2015 Minimum Extent

Arctic Sea Ice Summertime Minimum Is Fourth Lowest on Record According to a NASA analysis of satellite data, the 2015 Arctic sea ice minimum extent is the fourth lowest on record since observations from space began. The analysis by NASA and the NASA-supported National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado…

NASA State of Sea Level Rise Science 2015 – 30 feet of SLR possible by 2100

Excerpt from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vDdNxb2xVBU Members of NASA’s new interdisciplinary Sea Level Change Team discussed recent findings and new agency research efforts during a media teleconference Aug. 26, 2015, at 12:30 p.m. EDT. The panelists for this briefing were: — Michael Freilich, director of NASA’s Earth Science Division at the agency’s headquarters in Washington — Steve Nerem,…

NASA Rising Seas: The State of the Greenland Ice Sheet (2015)

Seas around the world have risen an average of nearly 3 inches since 1992, with some locations rising more than 9 inches due to natural variation, according to the latest satellite measurements from NASA and its partners. An intensive research effort now underway, aided by NASA observations and analysis, points to an unavoidable rise of…

The Hidden Meltdown of Greenland!

Aug. 28, 2015: More than 90 percent of our planet’s freshwater ice is bound in the massive ice sheets and glaciers of the Antarctic and Greenland. As temperatures around the world slowly climb, melt waters from these vast stores of ice add to rising sea levels. All by itself, Greenland could bump sea levels by…

Sea level rise of the past 23 years explained

Oceanographer Josh Willis from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory narrates this video about the causes of sea level rise and how sea level has changed over the last two decades as observed by the Jason series of satellite missions. Source

The troubling reasons why NASA is so focused on studying sea level rise

Eric Rignot: Observations suggest that ice sheets and glaciers can change faster, sooner and in a stronger way than anticipated

Eric Rignot Professor of Earth system science at the University of California, Irvine, and scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory was interviewed on sea level rise and projections. Ice sheets and glaciers can change faster, sooner and in a stronger way than anticipated Machens: As an ice sheet expert, how do you see the sea-level projections…